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President Bush Announces 
2002 Drug Control Strategy

   Summary & Comments By Terence T. Gorski

  Remarks by The President, February 12, 2002

  Discussion In 2002 Budget Request

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Posted On: February 28, 2002          Updated On: March 01, 2002
© Terence T. Gorski, 2002

The President's 2002 Drug Control Strategy

Summary & Comments 
By Terence T. Gorski
March 1, 2002

On February 12, 2002 President Bush announced his 2002 drug control strategy in remarks made in the East Room of the White House.  A number of groups that were influential in developing this strategy were present including the Members of Congress, The Coast Guard, and representatives of drug free community projects, law enforcement, and prevention.  Representatives of the treatment community were not present.  Here are the highlights of President Bush's Remarks:

 1.       Making the Drug War a Top Priority:  The President announced his intention to of "putting the fight against drugs in the center of our national agenda."  He meant, of course, illegal drugs.  He made no reference to alcohol, tobacco, or prescription drugs.  He also drew no distinction among drug use, drug abuse, and drug addiction.

2.        Relating The War On Drugs to the War On Terrorism: The President related his war against drugs to the war against terrorism in two ways:

         First, the President noted the financial links between the drug trade and terrorist groups by saying "the drug trade supports terrorist networks.  When people purchase drugs, they put money in the hands of those who want to hurt America and hurt our allies. Drugs attack everything that is the best about this country, and I intend to do something about them."  

         Second, the President pointed out the Americans who refuse to use drugs are actively defending America and fighting against terror by saying: "one thing that citizens can do to defend America and help the fight against terror is not purchase illegal drugs."  He emphasized this point by saying:  "Make no mistake about it, if you're buying illegal drugs in America, it is likely that money is going to end up in the hands of terrorist organizations."

Note:    To understand the potential implications this relationship could could have for the addicted and recovering people of America and their families click here.

3.         The President's Three-Point Plan:  The President then announced what he called "a new strategy to combat drugs in America" that is based upon three key objectives:  

    Drug interdiction programs to limit drug supply, 

    Prevention programs to reduce the demand for drugs

    Drug treatment programs to provide "effective and compassionate drug treatment".  

4.         Measurable Goals:  The President emphasized the need to take decisive action and to measure results.  He said:  "I believe by moving aggressively, without hesitation or apology, in all three of these areas we can make an enormous difference in America. And progress must be measured.   I want to see a 10 percent reduction in teenage and adult drug use over the next two years, and a 25 percent reduction in drug use, nationally, over the next five years.  Those are our goals."

5.         Drug Interdiction:  The President said:  "We'll fight drug supply to reduce drug use, and punish those who deal in death ... The budget I've submitted includes nearly $2.3 billion dollars for drug interdiction -- an increase of over 10 percent from last year's budget ...  A more effective management of our border for homeland security will lead to better drug interdiction  ... I've requested $731 million for the Andean Counter-Drug initiative, the countries of Bolivia and Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela." 

6.        Limitations of Supply Reduction:  The president recognized that there are limits to what can be accomplished by focusing upon supply reduction when he said:  "We can work as hard as we possibly want on interdiction, but so long as there is the demand for drug in this country, some crook is going to figure out how to get them here.  And so a central focus of this strategy is to reduce demand."

7.         Demand Reduction:  The president recognizes the vital link between demand and supply.  He said:  "The best way to affect supply is to reduce demand for drugs ... As demand goes down, so will supply ... The two are linked, but the reduction in demand is central to an effective strategy."

A.        Putting Parents Center Stage:  The President put parents center stage in reducing the demand for drugs by challenging them "to convince our children that the use of drugs is destructive in their lives.  And that starts with good parenting. It is essential that our parents understand that they're the child's most important teacher, and that the message of our parents must be unequivocal:  don't use drugs."

C.        Community Involvement:  The President believes that community involvement involvement can help lower the demand for drugs.  So part of his strategy is to "rally interests and concerned citizens to come with a local grass-roots effort, all aimed at educating kids, and all aimed at pulling community resources together to make a clear statement, a clear responsible statement, that drugs will destroy -- don't use them."

D.        Drug Free Community Support Program:  And so we support the drug free community support program, by $10 million, to encourage these grass-roots efforts, kind of the bottom-up effort to reduce demand in America.  The money will help coalitions -- the formation of coalitions, effective coalitions of business leaders and teachers and families and law enforcement.  And, oh, the faith community, we must never forget the faith community in America.  Our government must not fear the involvement of faith-based programs.  As a matter of fact, we've got to welcome faith-based programs.

E.        Treatment:  Last on the President's list of components needed to reduce demand is treatment.  The president says this:  "And, finally, treatment. ...  We must aggressively promote drug treatment. Because a nation that is tough on drugs must also be compassionate to those addicted to drugs.  Today, there are 3.9 million drug users in America who need, but who did not receive, help.  And we've got to do something about that.  We've got to help."

            "We're, therefore, proposing $3.8 billion for drug treatment and research.  This is an increase in our budget of over 6 percent.  We'll work with state governments to provide treatment where it is needed most, and the federal dollars will be distributed to states to support efforts that work -- not efforts that might sound good, but efforts that actually accomplish the objective of saving people's lives.  This includes $100-million increase in treatment spending as part of a plan to spend $1.6 billion over the next five years."

F.        High Risk Populations:  The President's drug control strategy will place special emphasis on targeting treatment spending for those who are most vulnerable to drug abuse.  This includes people like pregnant moms, the homeless, people with HIV/AIDS, and teenagers.  The President said:  "So while we've asked for an increase in treatment, there will be some targeted people we're trying to help, to make sure that those get special attention and special help in our treatment programs."

8.         Who The President Looks To For Implementation:   It is clear that the President looks to many people for help in implementing his drug control strategy.  He put it this way:  "We understand we can't do it alone here in Washington.  And that's why our approach is a community-based approach.  That's why we recognize the true strength of the country is our people.  And we know there's thousands of parents, thousands of educators, thousands of community activists, law enforcement officials, all anxious to come together to achieve this national strategy."  It's important to notice that the President did not mention treatment providers as being an important group needed for the success of his drug control strategy. 

9.        Stressing The Moral Model of Drug Abuse:  The President concludes by stressing the moral model of drug abuse when he says:  "There is a moral reason for this fight ... and it's this:  drugs rob men and women and children of their dignity and their character.  Illegal drugs are the enemies of ambition and hope.

10.      What's Missing From The President's Drug Control Strategy:  Several critical things are missing from the President's proposed drug control strategy.  These are:

A.        Recognition of Addiction Treatment As Critical To Homeland Defense:  Recognition that addiction treatment is a critical component in homeland defense.  The increased level of national stress resulting from the ongoing war on terrorism will result in an increase of alcohol and drug abuse and addiction.  Addiction services need to be formally integrated as a critical compoennt of our public health system.

B.        Recognition of the True Nature of Addiction:  Addiction is a biopsychosocial brain disease that is relapsing in nature and requires life-long treatment.  The President's drug control strategy fails to base our national drug control policy on a science-based standards that recognizes the difference between drug use, drug abuse, and drug addiction and matches each of these problems to appropriate interventions.  

C.        Recognition of Alcoholism & Prescription Drug Addiction:  The Prersident's drug control strategy ignores the nation's largest and most serious drug problem - alcohol abuse and alcoholism.  The dynamics of addiction to all drugs, inlcuding alcohol, is similar.  The legal status of alcohol and prescription drugs separates them artificially from the "illegal drugs" like heroine, cocaine, and marijuana."  

D.        Stigma Reduction:   Recognition of the need to emphasize our national desire to help addicts to recover instead of our desire to punish them with long-term incarceration.  It is impoortant to reduce the stigma associated with alcohol and drug problems and to make it socially and morally acceptable to acknowledge alcohol and drug problems and seek treatment without fear of punishment.  The major reason that most people with alcohol and drug problems refuse to seek help is the problem of stigma.  Stigmatizing models portray the drug abuser within the context of a moral model that casts them in the role of a criminal, terrorist supporting, immoral demons who will only seek help when put under the threat of pounishment.  This approach increases stigma and makes people less likely to seek drug treatment for themselves or loved ones due to shame and the fear of punishment.   

E.        Recognition of the Need for Insurance Reimbursement:   Recognition of the need for insurance companies to reimburse for addiction treratment according to the same standards used for other chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

F.        Suppport & Recognition of The Nation's Drug Treatment Providers:  America has the best team of drug treatment providers in the world.  The President's lack of support and recognition is serious problem.  Any effective drug control strategy must recognize and support this national team of alcohol and drug treatment providers and empower them to exert leadership in community efforts to manage alcohol and drug problems;  

G.        Recognition of Twelve Step Programs & Recovering People:  Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Related Twelve Step Programs are the most effective and least expensive community-based support groups that helps people to stop drug use.  His failure to specifically recognize the contribution of the recovering Twelve Step Community and actively seek there support is serious failing of this strategy.

Hopefully these critical elements can be included as a result of future discussion and debate.

For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
February 12, 2002

President Bush Announces 2002 Drug Control Strategy
Remarks by the President on the 2002 National Drug Control Strategy
The East Room

Read This Article On The White House Website:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/02/20020212-8.html

     Fact Sheet

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, thank you very much, John.  This nation has got some big challenges ahead of her.  One big challenge, of course, is to defend freedom, is to remain united as we fight for the very values that we hold so dear.

And another big challenge is to battle drug use.  Drugs undermine the health of our citizens; they destroy the souls of our children.  And the drug trade supports terrorist networks.  When people purchase drugs, they put money in the hands of those who want to hurt America, hurt our allies. Drugs attack everything that is the best about this country, and I intend to do something about them.

Today, I'm proud to announce a national drug control strategy.  It is a plan that will lay out a comprehensive strategy for our nation.  We're putting the fight against drugs in the center of our national agenda.  And I'm grateful for all of you who are here.

I want to thank John and those who work with him for taking on this enormous task.  I also want to thank members of the United States Congress who are here:  Senators Graham and Hatch, thank you both for coming today. I appreciate Elijah Cummings and Ernest Istook from Oklahoma; and Sander Levin from Michigan; John Mica, Florida; Rob Portman of Ohio; and Chairman Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin; Mark Souder from Indiana.  Thank you all for coming.  Your presence here shows our mutual commitment to put policy in place that will make a huge difference in the lives of many, many of our citizens.

I'm also so grateful for Admiral Loy for being here, of the United States Coast Guard.  I had the honor of traveling to Maine recently to announce a significant initiative for the Coast Guard, a strong commitment by our administration to boost spending to make sure the Coast Guard is modern and capable of not only defending our borders, but actively being engaged in the fight to interdict drugs that could be coming into our country overseas.  Admiral Loy, I'm proud to have you here and I'm proud of your team.

I also want to thank many ambassadors who are here, ambassadors from our neighbors to the south, the ambassador to Russia.  I'm so grateful that you all are here and willing to lend your nations' support in this great cause.

I also want to thank the citizens who are here.  We've got a fabulous group of citizens from around the nation representing groups that are -- have made the decision to do something about drug use.  We've got community groups and prevention groups and law enforcement groups and I want to thank you for coming.  And I hope you go back and when you go home, thank the folks that are working with you on behalf of a grateful nation.

We've got a problem in this country.  Too many people use drugs, and this is an individual tragedy.  And, as a result, it's a social crisis. There is no question that drug use wreaks havoc on the very fabric that provides stability for our society.  Drug use wreaks havoc on our families. Drug use destroys people's ambitions and hopes.

More than 50 percent of our high school seniors have said that they've experimented with illegal drugs at least once prior to graduation.  There's some new, "hip" drugs, like ecstacy and GHB.  They're kind of fads.  But they're dangerous and lethal, and they're taking too many lives.

And we know the results.  We know what can happen.  The important bond between parents and children are fractured and broken, sometimes forever. Schools can turn into places of violence and chaos, as opposed to places of learning and hope.  Productive citizens can become so dependent, so addicted, that they live a life of hopelessness.  We've got to do something about it here in America.

Drugs constitute a huge challenge to the very health of our nation. Illegal drugs cost our health care system almost $15 billion a year.  And illegal drugs are directly implicated in the deaths of almost 20,000 Americans a year.  Drug use causes people to commit crime, making neighborhoods less safe and less secure for our families.  Drugs help supply the deadly work of terrorists.  That's so important for people in our country to understand.

You know, I'm asked all the time, how can I help fight against terror? What can I do, what can I as a citizen do to defend America?  Well, one thing you can do is not purchase illegal drugs.  Make no mistake about it, if you're buying illegal drugs in America, it is likely that money is going to end up in the hands of terrorist organizations.  Just think about the Taliban in Afghanistan -- 70 percent of the world's opium trade came from Afghanistan, resulting in significant income to the Taliban, significant amount of money to the people that were harboring and feeding and hiding those who attacked and killed thousands of innocent Americans on September the 11th.  When we fight drugs, we fight the war on terror.

Today, I'm pleased to announce a new strategy to combat drugs in America.  We're determined to limit drug supply, to reduce demand and to provide addicts with effective and compassionate drug treatment.  Each of these steps is essential, and they're inseparable.  And these steps must be funded, which is why the budget I submitted to Congress calls for $19 billion to fight drug use.

We'll fight drug supply to reduce drug use, and punish those who deal in death.  More than 280 metric tons of cocaine and 13 metric tons of heroin enter our country each year.  To stop drugs from reaching our borders, the budget I've submitted includes nearly $2.3 billion dollars for drug interdiction -- an increase of over 10 percent from last year's budget.  With the Coast Guard's help, and with out partners in other nations, with the collaborative efforts with the leaders of all the nations in our neighborhood, we're going to fight drug traffickers, whether they try to bring the drugs in this country by sea, by land or by air.

I also want to target the supply of illegal drugs that are the source, particularly those in the Andean nations.  That's why I've requested $731 million for the Andean Counter-Drug initiative, the countries of Bolivia and Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela.  And I look forward to making sure the program is effective, that crop substitution works and crop destruction goes forward.

I look forward to working with your Presidents and telling them, point-blank, how anxious I am to make sure that our efforts to interdict supply is effective and meaningful and measurable and real.

I've also asked our Homeland Security Director, Tom Ridge, to examine ways we can improve our national border management system, to make sure we achieve what we want on our borders, which is commerce to move, but to stop the illegal flow of drugs. A more effective management of our border for homeland security will lead to better drug interdiction in our southern and northern borders.

However, it is important for Americans and American families to understand this:  that the best way to affect supply is to reduce demand for drugs; that we can work as hard as we possibly want on interdiction, but so long as there is the demand for drug in this country, some crook is going to figure out how to get them here.  And so a central focus of this strategy is to reduce demand; is to convince our children that the use of drugs is destructive in their lives.  And that starts with good parenting. It is essential that our parents understand that they're the child's most important teacher, and that the message of our parents must be unequivocable:  don't use drugs.

And so one of the things we're going to work hard to do is to fire up the Parents Drug Corps, is to fund an initiative that will convince and rally parents to do their job.  I say that if we want to usher in a period of personal responsibility, if we want a new culture that changes from if-it-feels-good-do-it, to one that says we're responsible for our decisions, it begins with moms and dads being responsible parents, by telling their children they love them on a daily basis.  And if you love somebody, you'll also tell them not to use drugs.

We know that community involvement can help defeat demand. Congressman Portman and Congressman Levin know that firsthand.  They have been involved in their communities to rally interests and concerned citizens to come with a local grass-roots effort, all aimed at educating kids, and all aimed at pulling community resources together to make a clear statement, a clear responsible statement, that drugs will destroy -- don't use them.

And so we support the drug free community support program, by $10 million, to encourage these grass-roots efforts, kind of the bottom-up effort to reduce demand in America.  The money will help coalitions -- the formation of coalitions, effective coalitions of business leaders and teachers and families and law enforcement.  And, oh, the faith community, we must never forget the faith community in America.  Our government must not fear the involvement of faith-based programs.  As a matter of fact, we've got to welcome faith-based programs.

This initiative is coupled with a faith-based initiative, will help rally the armies of compassion, those citizens who love their neighbor like they'd like to be loved themselves, to help send a clear message that we love you, we love you so much we're going to convince you not to use drugs in the future.

We also know that early drug education defeats demand, and so in my budget there are $644 million on the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Program.  That is a significant commitment.  We also want to make sure that it is effective, that the message that gets into the schools is one that sends this clear message:  don't use drugs, no ands, ifs or buts.  Don't use them.  And we know the media can have a powerful effect. And so we've got a $180 million on the national youth anti-drug media campaign, a series of messages which lay out the hazards of drug use.  And so ours is a concerted effort to reduce demand.  It's central to making sure we've got an effective strategy.

As demand goes down, so will supply.  As we reduce demand in America, it will take the pressure off of our friends in the south.  It will make it easier for our friends in Mexico to deal with the drug problem.  It will make it easier for Colombia to be able to deal with the growers and the mobsters who tend to wreak havoc in your country.  The two are linked, but the reduction in demand is central to an effective strategy.

And, finally, treatment.  We must aggressively promote drug treatment. Because a nation that is tough on drugs must also be compassionate to those addicted to drugs.  Today, there are 3.9 million drug users in America who need, but who did not receive, help.  And we've got to do something about that.  We've got to help.

We're, therefore, proposing $3.8 billion for drug treatment and research.  This is an increase in our budget of over 6 percent.  We'll work with state governments to provide treatment where it is needed most, and the federal dollars will be distributed to states to support efforts that work -- not efforts that might sound good, but efforts that actually accomplish the objective of saving people's lives.  This includes $100-million increase in treatment spending as part of a plan to spend $1.6 billion over the next five years.

Now, one of the things in our strategy that I hope you find interesting and is important is that we're actually going to start targeting treatment spending for those who are most vulnerable -- people like pregnant moms, the homeless, people with HIV/AIDS, and teenagers.  So while we've asked for an increase in treatment, there will be some targeted people we're trying to help, to make sure that those get special attention and special help in our treatment programs.

I believe by moving aggressively, without hesitation or apology, in all three of these areas we can make an enormous difference in America. And progress must be measured.  I told John when he signed on, I'm the kind of fellow that likes to say, what are the results?  I like to know, actually, are we making a difference?  And so here's our goal, here's the goal by which we'll be measured -- here's the goal which I'll be measured first, and then John will definitely be measured if I'm measured. (Laughter.)

I want to see a 10 percent reduction in teenage and adult drug use over the next two years, and a 25 percent reduction in drug use, nationally, over the next five years.  Those are our goals.

We understand we can't do it alone here in Washington.  And that's why our approach is a community-based approach.  That's why we recognize the true strength of the country is our people.  And we know there's thousands of parents, thousands of educators, thousands of community activists, law enforcement officials, all anxious to come together to achieve this national strategy.

I know they're ambitious goals, but when we meet them, our nation is going to be safer and more hopeful.  You see, there is a moral reason for this fight.  There is a moral reason to achieve this grand national objective, and it's this:  drugs rob men and women and children of their dignity and their character.  Illegal drugs are the enemies of ambition and hope.

Thank you for joining the fight.  May God bless you all.  (Applause.)

Read This Article On The White House Website:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/02/20020212-8.html

President Bush's Plan To Combat Crime and Drug Abuse
Discussion In 2002 Budget Plan

<Read It On the White House Web Site>

<Go To Table of Contents For President Bush's 2002 Proposed Budget>

The rate of serious crime reported by State and local law enforcement agencies has dropped significantly in recent years. The 1999 Crime Index is down 19 percent from 1992, the eighth consecutive annual decline. Violent crimes, including murders and rapes, have fallen to the lowest level in two decades. Preliminary figures for the first six months of 2000 show a further decline in the crime rate. This success can be attributed to a number of factors, including the strong economy, demographic changes, and Federal aid to the front-line State and local police departments.

Drug abuse imposes a variety of costs on the Nation. These costs include cash costs for the investigation and prosecution of drug-related crimes and the incarceration and treatment of drug offenders, property losses of crime victims and insurance companies, and lost earnings due to illness and premature death. The total costs associated with drug abuse are estimated to exceed $100 billion annually. This figure does not capture the human costs associated with drug abuse wasted opportunities, families torn apart, and lives lost.

Drug abuse in the United States is down from 20 years ago, but it remains unacceptably high. According to the most recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA), 6.7 percent of the population 12 years or older reported using an illicit drug in the past month, up from 5.8 percent in 1992.

Among teenagers, the rate of illegal drug abuse is higher than in the population in general. According to the NHSDA, approximately nine percent of youths age 12 17 were current users of illegal drugs in 1999. That figure is down 21 percent since 1997, but substantially higher than the 5.3 percent found by the NHSDA in 1992. The number of young adults, ages 18 25, who have used drugs in the past month continues to rise, increasing from 14.7 percent in 1997 to 18.8 percent in 1999, nearly half again as much as the 13.1 percent rate in 1992.

In addition to the threats posed by marijuana and other traditional drugs such as cocaine and heroin, today's children must deal with a wave of new drugs that are especially dangerous. Synthetic "club drugs" such as Ecstasy, or MDMA, have become popular at clubs and raves. Among 12th-graders surveyed by Department of Health and Human Services' Monitoring the Future Study, 2000, 8.2 percent report using Ecstasy in the past year, compared to 5.6 percent in 1999. Eighth- and 10th-graders also reported significant increases in Ecstasy use in the past year.

The President's Plan of Action

The 2002 Budget addresses the social and economic costs of crime and drug abuse. Among other things, the initiatives, highlights of which are described below, will include expanding the range of community groups and parents who will engage in local drug prevention efforts, increasing drug treatment, taking steps to improve the safety of our schools, and enhancing the security of our borders.

In 2001, the Federal Government will spend more than $18 billion on drug control activities. This is in addition to State and local government expenditures of equal, if not greater, amounts. Despite the extraordinary efforts of law enforcement, the military, teachers, medical professionals, treatment workers, and others, drug abuse is unacceptably high. While we show improvement in eliminating some of the harmful effects of drug abuse, a more comprehensive and accountable approach is needed.

As part of the development of the next National Drug Control Strategy, the Administration will review current approaches, with the goal of distinguishing areas that are yielding sufficient results from those areas that are not. In particular, the review will look closely at the relative emphasis on demand reduction and supply reduction activities, as well as the amounts invested in individual programs by the Federal Government. The Administration intends to develop a drug control strategy that adequately addresses the problem, and is evidence-based, cost effective, and affordable.

Teaching Our Children to Avoid the Trap of Drugs: The Administration will empower parents, and community and faith-based groups to fight drugs. A 1997 General Accounting Office study found that community coalitions, particularly those that implement a comprehensive approach that targets multiple aspects of youths' lives, represent a promising prevention method to prevent combat drug abuse by teenagers. The 2002 Budget will include $50 million, $10 million more than in 2001, for the Drug Free Communities Support Program to support the President's initiative. The budget also plans for larger increases in subsequent years. The increase will help reach the children in communities not benefiting from the current program, will encourage the development of community anti-drug coalitions in under-served areas, and assist coalitions, including faith leaders, that work together to reduce drug abuse in their communities. The 2002 Budget also includes $5 million in matching funds to mobilize a Parent Drug Corps to train parents in how to fight drug abuse.

Upgrading the Drug Free Workplace Program: The Drug Free Workplace Program gives grants to organizations that help small businesses develop employee education programs and company drug policies. To date, the Small Business Administration (SBA) has not been able to meet the demand for assistance from intermediary partners; in 1999 SBA received 160 grant applications from intermediaries, but issued only 16 grants. To help meet this need, the President's Budget includes $5 million and proposes to spend $25 million over the next five years.

Closing the Treatment Gap and Increasing Support for Effective Treatment: The budget provides assistance to those who have become dependent on drugs and helps them rebuild their lives and become productive members of the community. While the Administration proposes a variety of treatment initiatives, there are two main concerns: the approaches must be evidence-based, and there must be real accountability for recipients.

The Administration's treatment-related initiatives include: increased funding for the National Institute on Drug Abuse's budget as part of the President's initiative to complete the doubling of the budget for the National Institutes of Health by 2003; providing $111 million of additional funding to increase access to substance abuse treatment and help to close the treatment gap, the difference between the number of individuals who would benefit from drug treatment and the number who receive it, by increasing funds for treatment-related programs; and targeting treatment to adolescents, a group identified by the Office of National Drug Control Policy as significantly underserved by existing treatment programs.

As part of the drug treatment initiative, the budget proposes $74 million ($11 million more than in 2001) for the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment program, which provides formula grants supporting drug and alcohol treatment in State and local correctional facilities. Faith-based treatment programs will be eligible to compete for these funds.

The Administration will promote drug-free Federal prisons through on-going drug testing of all prisoners and treatment of eligible inmates. Currently, 100 percent of all eligible Federal inmates are enrolled in intensive drug treatment programs. Probationers and parolees are required to pass drug tests and receive treatment as a condition of remaining on the street.

Drug courts are an effective and cost efficient way to help non-violent drug offenders commit to a rigorous drug treatment program in lieu of prison. By leveraging the coercive power of the criminal justice system, drug courts can alter the behavior of non-violent, low-level drug offenders through a combination of judicial supervision, case management, mandatory drug testing, and treatment to ensure abstinence from drugs, and escalating sanctions. The Department of Justice will support local drug courts that combine drug testing with effective monitoring at the historically high 2001 level of $50 million.

Leading and Working with Our Foreign Allies Against Drugs: The drug cartels are among the most powerful criminal groups ever to operate on American soil. No effort to stop these powerful organizations can succeed without the ability to strike at the cartel's leadership and reach criminal activity that recognizes no national boundaries. These powerful criminal organizations also pose a threat to our democratic allies throughout the Western Hemisphere. Left unchecked, this violence and widespread corruption could seriously undermine the rule of law in Mexico and Colombia.

The 2002 Budget requests more than $500 million in new funding to maintain programs, provided in the 2000 emergency supplemental to support Plan Colombia. Any successful counterdrug strategy in the region must include funding to bring greater economic and political stability to the region and a peaceful resolution to Colombia's internal conflict.

The Administration is committed to full funding of the Western Hemisphere Drug Elimination Act. Through 2001, Congress has appropriated $1.6 billion. The 2002 Budget provides an additional $278 million to upgrade drug interdiction efforts of the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs Service. It provides funds for the acquisition, construction, and improvement of ships, planes, and equipment to enhance counternarcotics efforts in both source nations as well as the drug transit zone.

Improving Anti-Drug Technology: The Administration requests additional funding to provide new technology to improve interdiction and coordination among law enforcement. The 2002 Budget includes $40 million for the Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center, an increase of $4 million over 2001, to provide state-of-the-art tools to enhance the capabilities of State and local law enforcement agencies for counterdrug missions.

Bolstering Southwest Border Prosecutorial Resources: Thousands of Federal drug arrests occurring near the Southwest border are referred to county prosecutors because the quantity of drugs seized is too small to meet the threshold set by local U.S. Attorneys for Federal prosecution. The 2002 Budget provides an additional $50 million to assist counties near the Southwest border with the costs of prosecuting and detaining these referrals. U.S. Attorneys will also be directed to revise drug seizure thresholds warranting Federal prosecution, thereby increasing Federal drug trafficking prosecutions. Grants will be administered by the Department of Justice and awarded based on Southwest border county caseloads for processing, detaining, and prosecuting drug and alien cases referred from Federal arrests.

Continuing Methamphetamine Laboratory Cleanup: The production and use of methamphetamine (meth) have been on the rise over the past few years, and the number of meth laboratories has increased dramatically across the country. Meth lab enforcement and clean-up efforts are complicated by the presence of hazardous materials produced during the manufacturing process. Cleaning up these labs is a costly and risky business. State and local law enforcement agencies can be overwhelmed by the need to confront even one large laboratory. As meth dealers and drug organizations have targeted rural communities, many of the local law enforcement agencies have neither the expertise nor the resources to deal with this serious threat. The 2002 Budget includes $20 million to assist State and local law enforcement agencies with the costs associated with meth cleanup, along with $28 million to aid meth enforcement.

Incarcerating the Most Dangerous Drug Offenders: The budget includes $821 million for prison construction and placing newly-constructed Federal prisons into service and for contract bed space to prevent dangerous levels of overcrowding in Federal prisons. In addition, the budget includes $5 million to establish a faith-based, prison pre-release pilot program. The pilot will be hosted at four Federal prisons that are geographically diverse, encompass varying levels of security, and include both male and female inmate populations. The goal of the initiative is to reduce the recidivism rate among ex-offenders. The budget also includes $140 million to support additional detention beds to keep pace with the growth in the criminal and alien detainee population.

Establishing Project Sentry and Project Child Safe: The budget proposes a new Federal-State partnership by creating Safe Schools Task Forces across the country to coordinate better prosecutorial resources devoted to promoting school safety through appropriate firearms prosecutions. Project Sentry will devote $9 million annually to fund a dedicated juvenile gun prosecutor in each of the 94 U.S. Attorneys offices around the country. The State and local partnerships will be funded by $20 million in existing Department of Justice State and local Safe School grants.

Another partnership program will ensure that child safety locks are available for every handgun in America by providing $75 million annually in Federal matching funds through the Department of Justice. States and local governments will receive $65 million annually to assist the purchase and distribution of safety locks. The remaining $10 million will go to administrative costs and advertising, including a national toll-free telephone line, to make sure all parents are aware of the program.

Reallocating Grant Funding to Higher Priorities: The Administration seeks to finance some of the increases discussed above through selected reductions to State and local law enforcement grant programs. To a great degree, States and localities have proved themselves able to pursue vigorous law enforcement agendas without relying on Federal grant funding. For every dollar the Federal Government spends on criminal justice, State and local governments spend almost six, and Federal assistance makes up less than five percent of State and local law enforcement spending. For example, among the programs proposed for reduction are the State Prison Grant program, which has largely accomplished its goal of encouraging States to toughen their "truth in sentencing" laws; and non-formula Byrne grants, most of which are not awarded on a competitive basis, due to congressional earmarks.

Go To Table of Contents For President Bush's 2002 Proposed Budget

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