The Addiction Web Site of Terence T. Gorski

Best Practice Principles  - Articles  - Publications

Mission & Vision -  Clinical Model - Training & Consulting

Home - What's New - Site Map - Search - Book Reviews

 Links - Daily News Review 

  Research Databases  - Leading Addiction Websites -

Special Focus:  Mental Health, Substance Abuse, & Terrorism

Young Inmates More Likely Than Adults
To Return to Crime

GORSKI-CENAPS Web Publications
www.tgorski.com
Published On: August 01, 2001          Updated On: April 13, 2002
© Terence T. Gorski, 2001

Review These Books & Manuals

              

Visit GORSKI-CENAPS Books - www.relapse.org 1-800-767-8181

Training & Consultation: www.tgorski.com, www.cenaps.com, www.relapse.org  Gorski-CENAPS, 17900 Dixie Hwy, Homewood, IL 60430, 708-799-5000 

Young Inmates More Likely Than Adults to Return to Crime (010801)

On Jul 31, 2001 Amanda Riddle of the Associated Press reported that a recent study in the State of Florida shows that young inmates are more likely than adults to return to crime after being released from prison.  Youth advocates say the study supports their criticism of Florida's stringent laws for young criminals.  A 1996 study that showed Florida youth transferred to adult court were a third more likely to commit another offense than those sent to the juvenile system for the same crime.

On Jul 31, 2001 Amanda Riddle of the Associated Press reported that a recent study in the State of Florida shows that young inmates are more likely than adults to return to crime after being released from prison.

While a state official said the findings support national research showing juveniles' recidivism rates are higher than adults', youth advocates say the study supports their criticism of Florida's stringent laws for young criminals.

The laws, which allow prosecutors to try juveniles as adults and subject them to mandatory prison sentences, came under scrutiny in the wake of two recent South Florida murder cases where 14-year-old boys were sentenced as adults.

Lionel Tate received a life sentence in March for fatally beating a 6-year-old family friend. Nathaniel Brazill was sentenced Friday to 28 years in prison for shooting his teacher.

The study by the state Department of Corrections analyzed recidivism rates for inmates released from prison since July 1993. It included only those arrests that resulted in convictions.  The report found the following rearrest rates for different populations of inmates :

     Prisoners Under Age 18 When Released:  51.3% rearrested within 2 years.

     Average Of all inmates Released:  34% rearrested within 2 years. 

     Prisoners Between 18 & 24 Years Old When Released: 40% rearrested within 2 years

"Once they get a felony conviction and go to prison, this has lifelong consequence in terms of your job prospects and what you then can do when you come out," said Melissa Sickmund, senior research associate with the Pittsburgh, Pa.-based National Center for Juvenile Justice.

The study also found that young inmates return to crime sooner than older ones. It took 18 months for 47 percent of inmates under 18 to commit another offense, compared to four years for those 25 to 34 years old.

"Putting kids in the adult system is pretty much giving up on them, as these data prove," said Vincent Schiraldi, president of the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice in Washington, D.C.

Florida is one of the nation's leaders in sending youth to adult prisons. The state transferred 3,297 youths to the adult system in 1999-2000, compared to 5,350 in 1995-96. The reduction reflects a nationwide drop in crime.

Schiraldi said the state should keep more young offenders in the juvenile justice system, where educational, vocational and substance abuse treatment programs provide them a greater chance of turn their lives around.

But Bill Bales, bureau chief of the Correction Department's Bureau of Research and Data Analysis, said the study wasn't intended to evaluate the effectiveness of the adult prison system for rehabilitation compared to juvenile facilities.

The study's findings that Florida's youth return to the prison system at higher rates than adults "is really consistent with virtually all studies that examine recidivism," he said.

Bales also said that it's the worst youth who are transferred to the adult system, so they're more likely to return to a life of crime than the general adult population, who have been incarcerated for a broader range of offenses.

However, Schiraldi pointed to a 1996 study that showed Florida youth transferred to adult court were a third more likely to commit another offense than those sent to the juvenile system for the same crime.

He praised a new state law that will keep juveniles housed separately from adults inmates until age 18. But judges, not prosecutors, should be given the power to transfer juveniles to the adult system, he said.

"I still think there's room for a lot more reform in the Florida system," he said.

On the Net:  Department of Corrections: http://www.dc.state.fl.us/

Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice: http://www.cjcj.org

This story can be found at : http://ap.tbo.com/ap/florida/MGA7SV0DUPC.html

Other Stories On Adolescent Alcohol, Drugs, & Violence

ADD & ADHD Medication Options
Adolescent Admissions for Addiction Treatment (1994 - 1999)
Adolescent Cannabis Study
Adolescent Marijuana Problems
Adolescent Offenders
Adolescent Relapse Prevention
Adolescents
Adolescents/School_Shootings/school_shootings_030713.htm
Adolescents/School_Shootings/youth_violence_surgeon_general.htm
Arms & Boys
Child TV Violence Linked To Adult Violence
clin_mod/ddc/ADHDkids.gif
Club Drugs & Violence - Who's To Blame?
Does Sex Education Work
Gorski's Position On Sentencing Children As Adullts
Helping Children Handle Disaster-Related Anxiety
Interview With David Grossman 04-23-01
Juvenile Justice Reforms In San Francisco
Juveniles in Adult Prisons and Jails
Kids In Prison - Miami Herald Series March 2001
Lionel Tate Sentencing
Many Schools Not Drug-Free
Marijuana - Things You Should Know
Marijuana Use Up Among Young Arrestees
Marijuana: Talking Points for Parents
More U.S. Teens Treated For Addiction
No Clemency For Lionel Tate Fourteen Year Old boy  Sentenced To Life In Prison
ONDCP Says Treatment Not Punishment For Drug Abusing Kids
Prevention - Substance Use Risk Related To Type Of Residential Parent
School Violence
School Violence
Student Assistance Programs vs Drug Testing
Study on Parental Marijuana Use
Teen Alcohol & Drug Use Increases
Terrorism - Helping Kids Cope
The Failure of Sex Education
Thirteen Year-old Boy Sentenced To 28 Years In Adult Prison
U.S. Teen Births at Record Low
Understanding Youth Culture:  Table of Contents
Violence
Violence: Young Girls Victimized by Their Dates
War On Drugs Linked To Gaps In Mental Health Services For Children
What's New - Titles Only
Young Inmates More Likely Than Adults to Return to Crime

 

Home - What's New - Site Map - Search Gorski's Site - Articles - Book Reviews

Mission & Vision - Training & Consultation Services - Publications - Links

Daily News Review  -  Addiction Databases  - Leading Addiction Websites

GORSKI-CENAPS Clinical Model --- Research-Based Best Practice Principles

Special Focus:  Mental Health, Substance Abuse, & Terrorism

Terry Gorski and Other Members of the GORSKI-CENAPS Team are Available To Train & Consult On Areas Related To Recovery, Relapse Prevention, & Relapse Early Intervention

Address: 6147 Deltona Blvd, Spring Hill, FL  34606
info@enaps.com; www.tgorski.com, www.cenaps.com, www.relapse.org